20
Feb 15

10 Ways to Use Scrivener for Poetry Manuscripts

Scrivener is well known for being a great writing tool for novelists, screenwriters, and long-form non-fiction writers, but when my friend mentioned she used Scrivener for poetry manuscripts, I was intrigued. As a poet, I’d always used Microsoft Word, with quite a bit of frustration. I usually write first drafts by hand in a notebook, then type them in Word, and save multiple files of subsequent drafts. The biggest problem was putting together a poetry manuscript. I would copy and paste each poem into one big file, which became unwieldy. It was especially tricky to keep track of subsequent versions of poems once the big file was created; each time I edited a poem in a single file I’d have to remember to update the main manuscript doc as well. I’d also have to save multiple versions of that main file with different types of front matter depending on where I was sending the manuscript (some places want acknowledgements, some don’t; some want a title page with contact info, some without; etc.). And worst of all, it was really annoying in Word to try to mess around with the order of poems in a manuscript––cutting and pasting them throughout the main doc, and then manually updating the TOC.

Once I took a look at Scrivener I immediately could see the benefits of using it for a poetry manuscript. I spent a chunk of hours one afternoon going through the main tutorial, and then started using it and figuring out how to make it work for a poetry manuscript. It isn’t always easy, but Scrivener understands the writer’s need to organize and re-organize pieces of text, to categorize pieces of text in certain ways, and that’s why even while Scrivener sometimes gets confusing it’s actually fun to try to figure out how to make it work for you.

These tips will be useful to you if you already use Scrivener and have gone through the main tutorial. Here are my 10 favorite ways Scrivener is useful for a poetry manuscript:

1) Reorder poems

This is a simple but brilliant function. Reordering is something most poets do constantly while working on a manuscript. When I first starting using Scrivener, I imported all my poem files from my current manuscript and dumped them into a “binder.” Now that each poem was living in my Scrivener binder as separate documents, I could easily drag each document and reorder the manuscript to my heart’s content. I keep all the documents for the manuscript in one folder with the manuscript title. When you’ve found the current order you like, you send the group of documents to “compile,” where you can export it to an RTF or PDF. Whenever you create a new order you like and want to save, you just “compile” it again (but see below in #2 about updating the TOC each time you reorder). No more cutting and pasting individual poems within a large Word doc!

2) Create and Modify a TOC

To create a TOC in Scrivener, you select all the documents that you want to include in the TOC, go to “Edit” –> “Copy Special”–> “Copy Documents as TOC.” Then you open a new document and paste. The TOC will format itself, and create poem titles based on the document names (so be sure to name those documents based on the poem titles). This is all in the main Scrivener tutorial. The TOC will not automatically update every time you move around or delete a poem, so you have to re-do the TOC every time you change the manuscript order. I don’t mind this, because it still takes out the hassle of creating a manual TOC in Word.

You may find there are some wonky issues that come up when creating a TOC in Scrivener in general, depending on what program you export the manuscript to, but these problems can be solved with a little help from the Internets (I won’t reiterate those issues here, as they aren’t specific to poetry manuscripts). :)

3) Switch Between Different Versions of Front Matter

This is super helpful when you need to use different versions of front matter based on a press’s or contest’s specific requirements. Some presses want to see acknowledgements or a title page with contact info, some don’t. I created two versions of the front matter, and when I’m ready to compile the manuscript to send off to a contest, I have the option to choose the front matter I want to include. And thankfully, the front matter doesn’t get included in the page count, which was something I couldn’t figure out how to get around in a big, single Word doc.

To create front matter, add a folder called Front Matter outside the manuscript folder. Create the documents within the folder, i.e., Title (with contact), Title Only, TOC, Acknowledgements, Epigraphs, etc. Create a second folder, which I call Front Matter2, with the desired documents. During compile, choose the front matter version you want!

1-Compile_FM4) Keep Track of Status of Poems

For each document in Scrivener, you can assign a status, i.e., first draft, revised draft, final, etc. You can easily create your own statuses as well. On the right-hand side of every document is a section titled Synopsis, General, and Document Notes. In General, you’ll see Label and Status, which both have drop-down menus where you can choose or edit the labels. If you click on the drop-down menu in Status and click “Edit,” you can manage your classification system, or meta-data. I like to classify poems in the following way: Published, Maybe, First Draft, Revised Draft, Done.

2-Status

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5) Include or Exclude Specific Poems

As you probably know, a manuscript is never really done. Sometimes it’s “done enough” to start submitting (which is where I’m at right now), but you’re still tweaking along the way. I might have submitted my manuscript to a few contests, and then later was like––why did I include those five or ten poems that weren’t really good enough? (okay, that actually did happen, and continues to happen every time I look at the manuscript anew). These are poems I’m just not sure are worth keeping, but maybe at some point I can revise and salvage them. But I don’t want to include them in my current manuscript submission.

Recently, I went through my manuscript and started assigning the status “Maybe” to all those sad poems that have been around for a while and just aren’t getting any better. When I was finally ready to sort of let them go, I created a folder called “Maybe poems” and dragged them (kicking and screaming) out of my main manuscript folder. Then I created a new TOC and compiled a new manuscript with just the clean, finished poems from my main manuscript folder. I can always add back any Maybe poems by changing their status and dragging them back in, but they’re going to have to beg.

6) Work on Groups of Poems Based on Status

Sometimes I want to just work on revisions, and it’s nice to be able to quickly find and view just the poems I want to revise. (I assigned the “Revised Draft” status for these poems, because they have been revised and I want to keep revising them. The “Maybe” poems, on the other hand, have been revised but are very close in my mind to being discarded completely or being saved by a miracle). You could get even more specific with the level of draft you’re on or how you want to classify poems by status, of course.

To work on the poems that I think still have a chance at getting better, I created a search for my “Revised Draft” poems. I typed in “Revised Draft” in the search bar, and then chose “Status” from the dropdown menu.

3-Search_RevisedDraft

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I chose “Save Search As Collection” from that same dropdown menu, and, voila, I have a collection of my “Revised Draft” poems. I can now look at them on their own when I’m in revision mode.

4-Save Search as Collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m also now doing this with my “Done” poems as a way to focus while submitting. These are the poems I’m pretty sure are totally done being revised (I know, you’re never totally sure), and therefore are ready to be submitted to journals. Now I can view them together as a collection and start figuring out where to send them!

I can also do this with the poems that are already “Published” and designated as such, which is helpful for creating and updating an Acknowledgments page. This also allows me to easily count how many poems have been published, reminding me I need to send more of the others out!

7) View Earlier Versions of Poems

Instead of saving file after file of poems, as I used to do in Word, adding a number at the end of each file name to designate the draft, now I used Scrivener “snapshots.” These are easy to use and part of the main Scrivener tutorial. In Scrivener, you keep editing a poem in the very same document for it’s entire evolutionary existence, but you take “snapshots” along the way so you can refer back to earlier versions when needed. This is actually much simpler than looking through multiple Word files to find that one phrase you thought was great and you lost.

8) Use Labels (and Colors!) for Themes

This is fun. Most poetry manuscripts have themes that are threaded throughout. They may not be overt themes as in actual topics, but modes. When I print out and order a manuscript on the floor (which is still a great way to do it, but now that I’m using Scrivener I do it less often), I sometimes use markers to label poems with a particular color. In my current manuscript (which has some pretty clear themes) I have blue for cool/ice/snow-related poems, brown for animal poems, pink for myth-based poems, etc. I’m now using the Label feature in Scrivener to assign these labels to poems with colors. Here’s what some of them look like in Meta-Data (above) and in action in outline view (below).

5-Meta-data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6-LabelsPretty! But also really helpful conceptually. For example, do I really want to include those two icy poems side by side? It might work, but I might also consider spreading them out, as I’ve done with some of the other differently themed poems, so as not to have too many similar ones next to each other.

 

 

 

 

And here’s where you assign the Label on the right-hand side of the screen, like you do with Status:

7-Label

 

 

 

 

 

8) Write Notes on Poems

Sometimes I have ideas about a poem, and it’s useful to write them down in the Document Notes section on the right-hand side of the screen. I never really used to do that before, and because Scrivener offers this functionality, it’s actually influencing my creative process. Sometimes I need to think things through off to the side of the poem, ask myself if the poem fits in the manuscript, or what threads it picks up on, or if I want the title of the poem to reference another poem in the manuscript, etc. You can also write Project Notes as well.

9) Keep Research Close at Hand

Not everyone does research for poems, and it just so happens that for my current manuscript I am doing research (unlike my first manuscript which had zero research). So the Research section of the Scrivener binder is awesome. You can save all types of media including PDFs, web links, video, audio, etc. With the Research section I save articles and pictures, and then use the split screen functionality to work on a poem while referring to the text/picture that is inspiring me. So much fun!

8-Research 10) Create and Update Manuscript Styles

When you “compile” a manuscript to export from Scrivener to RTF or PDF, you can update the manuscript styles all at once. So instead of manually going through and changing the font or title style for each poem, you can focus on writing and revising, save formatting for the end, and do it all in one shot. I won’t go into much detail on all the wonders of the “compile” function, and if you’re already using Scrivener you probably have had the chance to play with this feature. Suffice it to say, it takes away a lot of the headache of formatting a complete manuscript of poems.

I’ve only just gotten started learning how to make Scrivener work for my poetry manuscript. Please comment with any other tips if you’ve tried it! Happy writing!


01
Feb 15

My client’s debut memoir book cover revealed!

I’m so proud to share that my client, Lene Fogelberg, has just shared the gorgeous cover of her debut memoir, Beautiful Affliction: A Memoir of Surviving Heart Disease, forthcoming from She Writes Press. I had the honor to work with Lene on this memoir, which even in its first draft was impossible to put down. In draft after draft, I watched the story find its shape, the writing tighten and distill to become even more powerful than my first read.

One thing I love about non-fiction is that often the telling of the story is more compelling than the subject matter itself. Some people are drawn to non-fiction, understandably, because of a personal connection or interest in the subject matter. As someone who hasn’t had a connection to the subject of heart disease, I wouldn’t necessarily have been drawn to a story like this. But the quality of the narrative––the way the author takes us through her psychological experiences living with a disease that for years was a mystery to her and her doctors, the way she carries us back and forth from childhood and adolescence through to the present––is what kept me enthralled. I can’t wait to hold a copy of this book in my hands!

BEAUTIFUL-AFFLICTION-cover


30
Jan 15

2nd Story Brewing to Sponsor March 20th Reading!

Poetry lovers, we are thrilled to announce that 2nd Story Brewing will be our drink sponsor for our spectacular March 20th reading, featuring Ross Gay, Rosebud Ben-Oni, and Ailish Hopper. Remember, this is the only reading of our spring season, so save the date, and better yet, get your advanced discount tickets while they last!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/red-sofa-reading-series-featuring-ross-gay-rosebud-ben-oni-and-ailish-hopper-tickets-15485915791

2nd_Story_Logo_Vertical


25
Jan 15

Get your advanced tickets for Red Sofa Reading Series March 20th Featuring Ross Gay, Rosebud Ben-Oni, and Ailish Hopper

March 20, 2015: Red Sofa Reading Series
Indy Hall
22 North 3rd Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106
redsofasalon@gmail.com
7:00pm
Tickets: $7 in advance, $10 at the door
Get your discounted tickets now!

Sponsored by 2nd Story Brewing!

2nd_Story_Logo_Vertical

ross_gayRosebud Ben-Oni Fall 2014ailish_hopper_photo

 

 

 

Ross Gay is the author of Against Which (CavanKerry Press, 2006) and Bringing the Shovel Down (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011). His poems have appeared in American Poetry ReviewMARGIE, Ploughshares and many other magazines. He has also, with the artist Kimberly Thomas, collaborated on several artists’ books: The Cold Loop, BRN2HNT and The Bullet. He is an editor with the chapbook press Q Avenue. Ross Gay received his M.F.A. in poetry from Sarah Lawrence College, and his Ph.D. in American Literature from Temple University. He teaches in the creative writing program at Indiana University.

Born to a Mexican mother and Jewish father, Rosebud Ben-Oni is a recipient of the 2014 NYFA Fellowship in Poetry and a CantoMundo Fellow. She was a Rackham Merit Fellow at the University of Michigan, and a Horace Goldsmith Scholar at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of SOLECISM (Virtual Artists Collective, 2013) and an Editorial Advisor for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts (vidaweb.org). Her work is forthcoming or appears in POETRY, The American Poetry Review, Arts & Letters, Bayou, Puerto del Sol, among others. Find out more about her at 7TrainLove.org.

Ailish Hopper is the author of Dark~Sky Society (2014), selected by David St. John as runner up for the New Issues prize, and the chapbook Bird in the Head (2005), selected by Jean Valentine for the Center for Book Arts Prize. Individual poems have appeared in AgniAPR, Blackbird, Harvard Review Online, Ploughshares, Poetry, Tidal Basin Review, and other places. She is currently at work on an essay that imagines the world after the reign of white supremacy, and the difficulties of imagining possibility. She has received support from the Baltimore Commission for the Arts and Humanities, the MacDowell Colony, Maryland State Arts Council, and Yaddo, and teaches at Goucher College and in the visual art MFA program at University of Maryland Baltimore County.

CONTACT: Hila Ratzabi
redsofasalon@gmail.com
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13
Jan 15

Announcing the Winter/Spring 2015 Workshop Schedule

Red Sofa Open House, Jan. 11, 2015. Photo by Sonia Petruse.

Red Sofa Open House, Jan. 11, 2015. Photo by Sonia Petruse.

This past weekend I had the pleasure of hosting two inspiring Red Sofa events: Friday was our first reading of the new year featuring three incredible poets & writers, and Sunday was the workshop open house. The energy at both events was infectious and nourishing for me and for those who were present.

Now is the time to make a commitment to your poetry writing practice and join the winter/spring workshop series. As always, the workshop includes homemade vegetarian food, wine, & drinks, and a supportive community in which to grow in your practice. Workshops include optional writing exercises, close readings of poems, and critiques of works in progress, in addition to an optional one-on-one conference with me. The workshop will run for 10 weeks on Sundays (1:00–3:30pm) starting Feb. 1st. The cost for the series is $400. Registration deadline is January 28th.

Special early bird discount of $20 off if you register by January 25th.

REGISTER NOW

If you have any questions, please email me at redsofasalon@gmail.com. I’m saving you a seat at the Red Sofa!

Hila


10
Dec 14

Announcing Winter/Spring 2015 Red Sofa Reading Series

I’m very happy to announce the Winter/Spring 2015 Red Sofa Reading Series coming up January 9th and March 20th! Mark your calendars!

January 9, 2015: Red Sofa Reading Series
Indy Hall
22 North 3rd Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106
redsofasalon@gmail.com
7:00pm
Tickets: $7 in advance, $10 at the door
Get your discounted tickets now!

nemser_p

Paul Lisicky is the author of five books: Lawnboy, Famous Builder, The Burning House, Unbuilt Projects, and The Narrow Door, forthcoming from Graywolf Press in 2015. His work has appeared in Conjunctions, Denver Quarterly, Fence, The Iowa Review, Ploughshares, Tin House, Unstuck, and elsewhere. His awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the James Michener/Copernicus Society, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. He has twice been a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award. He currently teaches in the MFA Program at Rutgers-Camden, the low residency program at Sierra Nevada College, and at the Juniper Summer Writing Institute. He is the editor ofStoryQuarterly and serves on the Writing Committee of the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.

Paul Nemser is the author of Taurus, which won the New American Poetry Prize (New American Press, 2013) and a chapbook of prose poetry, Tales of the Tetragrammaton (Mayapple Press, 2014). His poems have appeared in many magazines over the years, such as AGNIBlackbird, ColumbiaFulcrum, Poetry, Raritan, TriQuarterly, and Tupelo Quarterly. His work was recently the weekly feature at Linebreak, and he has poems forthcoming at Third Coast and London Review of Books. He lives in Cambridge, MA, and Harborside, ME, with his wife Rebecca.

Anne-Adele Wight is the author of Sidestep Catapult and Opera House Arterial, both published by BlazeVOX. Her work has appeared in American Writing, Philadelphia Poets, Tabula Rasa, Shrike, Apiary, Fairies in America, Luna Luna, and elsewhere. She has read extensively in the Philadelphia area and other locales. She curates the monthly Jubilant Thicket performance series and lives in Philadelphia with her husband and two cats.

CONTACT: Hila Ratzabi
redsofasalon@gmail.com
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March 20, 2015: Red Sofa Reading Series
Indy Hall
22 North 3rd Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106
redsofasalon@gmail.com
7:00pm
Tickets: $7 in advance, $10 at the door
Get your discounted tickets now!

ross_gayRosebud Ben-Oni Fall 2014ailish_hopper_photo

 

 

 

Ross Gay is the author of Against Which (CavanKerry Press, 2006) and Bringing the Shovel Down (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011). His poems have appeared in American Poetry ReviewMARGIE, Ploughshares and many other magazines. He has also, with the artist Kimberly Thomas, collaborated on several artists’ books: The Cold Loop, BRN2HNT and The Bullet. He is an editor with the chapbook press Q Avenue. Ross Gay received his M.F.A. in poetry from Sarah Lawrence College, and his Ph.D. in American Literature from Temple University. He teaches in the creative writing program at Indiana University.

Born to a Mexican mother and Jewish father, Rosebud Ben-Oni is a recipient of the 2014 NYFA Fellowship in Poetry and a CantoMundo Fellow. She was a Rackham Merit Fellow at the University of Michigan, and a Horace Goldsmith Scholar at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of SOLECISM (Virtual Artists Collective, 2013) and an Editorial Advisor for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts (vidaweb.org). Her work is forthcoming or appears in POETRY, The American Poetry Review, Arts & Letters, Bayou, Puerto del Sol, among others. Find out more about her at 7TrainLove.org.

Ailish Hopper is the author of Dark~Sky Society (2014), selected by David St. John as runner up for the New Issues prize, and the chapbook Bird in the Head (2005), selected by Jean Valentine for the Center for Book Arts Prize. Individual poems have appeared in AgniAPR, Blackbird, Harvard Review Online, Ploughshares, Poetry, Tidal Basin Review, and other places. She is currently at work on an essay that imagines the world after the reign of white supremacy, and the difficulties of imagining possibility. She has received support from the Baltimore Commission for the Arts and Humanities, the MacDowell Colony, Maryland State Arts Council, and Yaddo, and teaches at Goucher College and in the visual art MFA program at University of Maryland Baltimore County.

CONTACT: Hila Ratzabi
redsofasalon@gmail.com
Subscribe to Red Sofa Salon newsletter


16
Nov 14

Photos from Full Bleed Opening Night!

Thank you to CJ Dawson Photography for taking these amazing photos from our opening night event of the Full Bleed Poetry Comics show! Artwork is continuing to sell out fast at our online store. Hurry up and get yours! And enjoy the photos!

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20
Oct 14

Nov. 6–7, 2014: Two Special Events! FULL BLEED: Poetry Comics Show

Poster by Bianca Stone

Poster by Bianca Stone

Nov. 6–7, 2014: Two Special Events!

FULL BLEED: Poetry Comics Show

“The visual has always been an important means of communication, from caveman paintings, to graphic novels, to IKEA instruction manuals. We know it fits in somewhere with poetry, beginning with how poets and artists have always looked lovingly upon one another, and ending somewhere more uncharted. … Poetry and poets who interact with the visual has limitless implications, from traditional use of the comic-strip and comic book, to a much more experimental use of text and image. I wish to go boldly, willingly, into Poetry Comics, and see what people are doing out there. I’m not entirely concerned with defining what I mean by Poetry Comics, but rather seeing how many tiny silver arrows we can launch at it. And perhaps how many it can launch back at us.” –Bianca Stone

FULL BLEED celebrates the art of the poetry comic. In the same way that full bleed printing expands to the edge of the page, poetry comics dilate across genre lines. Poetry as bleeding heart mixes with the whimsy of comics to produce work that startles and ignites. Word and image hold hands, tell each other stories, console each other, party together.

Artwork from the show is now available for sale online! Visit our store to view pieces.

FEATURED POETS AND ARTISTS
Bianca Stone
is the co-founder and editor of Monk Books, author of Someone Else’s Wedding Vows (Tin House/Octopus Books, 2014), and co-author of Antigonick, with Anne Carson (New Directions, 2012). She founded the Ruth Stone Foundation in 2012 and lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Matthea Harvey is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Of Lamb and If the Tabloids are True What are You? and two books for children.

Sommer Browning‘s most recent book of poetry is Backup Singers (Birds, LLC; 2014). She is also the author of Either Way I’m Celebrating (Birds, LLC; 2011), a collection of poetry and comics, and various chapbooks. She works as a librarian in Denver.

Sampson Starkweather is the author of The First Four Books of Sampson Starkweather. He is a founding editor of Birds, LLC, an independent poetry press. His most recent chapbook is Flowers of Rad by Factory Hollow Press, and he lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Jon-Michael Frank has work published or forthcoming in Anti-, Inter/rupture, Sink Review, Sixth Finch, and Spork Press, among others. A chapbook of poems is forthcoming from Birds LLC, and another chapbook, of comics, is being released by El Aleph Press in 2014. Jon-Michael is also an assistant editor for the small press Birds, LLC, helps run a reading series in Austin, TX, called Fun Party, and sells illustrations about life, or the lack of it, on etsy.

Annie Mok makes comics, collaboratively and solo, acts, and sings in the pop group See-Through Girls. She lives in Philadelphia. “Shadow Manifesto” is a three-part series that ran on ZEAL, a website spotlighting criticism and responses to video games.

Paul Siegell is the author of wild life rifle fire, jambandbootleg, and Poemergency Room. He is a copywriter at the Philadelphia Inquirer and a senior editor at Painted Bride Quarterly. Kindly find more of Paul’s work – and concrete poetry t-shirts – at “ReVeLeR @ eYeLeVeL” (http://paulsiegell.blogspot.com/).

Emily Ballas is a Philadelphia-based graphic designer, for now. She is an eager, curious type. Design-wise and otherwise. Part builder, experimenter, and storyteller, Emily’s work can be found at www.emilyballas.com.

CURATOR
Hila Ratzabi is a poet and freelance editor. She is the author of the chapbook The Apparatus of Visible Things (Finishing Line Press, 2009). She is founder of the Red Sofa Salon & Poetry Workshop (and reading series) in Philadelphia, and the editor-in-chief and poetry editor of the literary journal Storyscape.

FULL BLEED: Poetry Comics Show
Thursday November 6th, 7:00pm
Exhibit preview and poetry reading featuring:
Bianca Stone
Sommer Browning
Sampson Starkweather
Annie Mok
Paul Siegell

Hosted by Hila Ratzabi

Friday November 7th, 5:00–9:00pm
First Friday opening night
Complimentary cupcakes from Whipped Bakeshop!
Live, sliding-scale sketch portraits of guests by artist Annie Mok!

Both events are free and take place at Indy Hall

Indy Hall, 22 N. 3rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19106
@indyhall_arts
@redsofasalon
#fullbleed


27
Jul 14

A Beautiful Collaboration

In spring 2013, I had the good fortune of having poet MaryAnn Miller join my Urban Nature Ecopoetry Workshop. From day 1 she was hooked; the workshop theme was right up her alley. It was wonderful to see MaryAnn’s poems in response to the environment, and yesterday we got to read together at Big Blue Marble Bookstore as part of an event called “For the Love of this Blue Planet: An Evening of Ecopoetry.” We also revealed the results of a collaboration. MaryAnn designed and printed broadsides of my poem, “Sedna the Arctic Sea Goddess,” originally published in Alaska Quarterly Review. I’m happy to announce the the limited edition broadside is now available for sale. Take a look, and enjoy! May your artistic collaborations be fruitful!

 


09
Jun 14

Design your ideal writing workshop — take our survey!

TheRedSofa-QuinoaPattiesConvo

The Red Sofa Salon & Poetry Workshop has been around since April 2013. We are still very new at this and are always interested in learning what YOU want from a writing workshop. Whether you’ve just discovered the Red Sofa or have been a curious lurker for a while, I’d love to get your feedback on what you are looking for in your ideal writing workshop. Please take the following short survey to share your thoughts. This is totally anonymous. If you’d like to talk more about your workshop needs after you’ve taken the survey, please email me at redsofasalon@gmail.com. I look forward to hearing from you!

Hila

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey , the world’s leading questionnaire tool.


19
May 14

Whitman in the Woods

This Sunday was the second workshop in the Urban Nature Ecopoetry series. We set up a picnic by the sandy shore of Wissahickon Creek, read poetry of the Romantics and Trascendentalists, and wrote our own poems inspired by our readings and the natural surroundings. It was a perfect spring evening! Check out the pics below, and please join us for this Thursday’s (May 22) workshop at Bartram’s Gardens where we’ll be reading William Carlos Williams’s “Spring & All.” Register here.

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08
May 14

Updated Schedule for Urban Nature Ecopoetry Workshop

Due to popular demand, the dates of the ecopoetry workshop have been amended. You also now have the option of joining for single workshop sessions as opposed to the whole batch.

Regular price is $50 per session, or discount: all 5 dates for $240. SPECIAL DISCOUNT if you attend the Red Sofa Reading Series tomorrow$40 per session, instead of $50.

Email redsofasalon@gmail.com to join. Register at the links below.

Register for full series @ $240 for 5 dates

Register for individual sessions @ $50 per date

Sunday May 18, 5:30–7:30pm: The Romantics and the Transcendentalists

Forbidden Drive (specific meeting spot announced to attendees)

Thursday May 22, 6:30–8:30pm: “Spring & All,” William Carlos Williams

At Bartram’s Gardens

Monday May 26, 6:30–8:30pm: Poetry of the Third Landscape: Experiments with Space

Location TBA

Monday June 2, 6:30–8:30pm: Activist Poetics

At the Red Sofa

Sunday June 8, 11:00am: Poetry of the Non-human

At the Philadelphia Zoo, followed by Philly Literary Family Reunion & Potluck at 1:00pm (Clark Park)